Last Week in Wardynski’s World

Incoherence is indicative of an “indisciplined” (to use one of W’s favorite words) mind. Last week we learned from Colonel Wardynski, Superintendent of the Huntsville City Schools, that:

  1. It is possible to be in two places at once.
  2. Talk is quantifiable.
  3. Obeying the law is optional.

1. The Lee Knife Incident

My kids were wee toddlers when they figured out something couldn’t be both in the playpen and out of the playpen at the same time. The Colonel and crew seem to have trouble with this concept. Consider this report from WAFF concerning a student who was on his way to Lee or at Lee with a knife.

“The school district confirmed the student was taken into custody by school leaders before he ever made it on campus with the knife.”

AND

“They took the student to the office last Thursday, questioned him, searched his backpack, and that’s when they discovered the knife.”

So was the kid on campus with a knife in his backpack, or was the kid not on campus with a knife in his backpack?

In the pen or out of the pen, but not in the pen and out of the pen, OK?

Sounds like some quick backtracking to me, as if the spokesperson realized that if the kid were walking down Meridian Street with a Swiss Army knife in his backpack, that isn’t quite the same as walking the halls of Lee High with a knife in his backpack. Correct me if I’m wrong, but it is still legal for me to walk the city streets with my pocket knife in my purse, right?

I’m curious about what “school leaders” have the right to take a kid into “custody” “before he ever made it on campus.”

But no matter: “Huntsville City Schools Superintendent Dr. Casey Wardynski said the district did everything right when responding to the threat.”  Whew, that’s a relief.

The Colonel said, “There are layers of security at the door, layers of security inside, there are humans inside looking at those types of things, and we have people watching the internet.”

What does this mean: “humans inside looking at those types of things”? What types of things? And “humans” as opposed to what, exactly?

As for “people watching the internet,” what can I say but welcome to my site and I hope you spend a good long time here.

I do have one suggestion on how better to employ the “humans inside.” Could they spare a few moments for a glance at the closed circuit TVs? Surely keeping an eye on what is happening now is important, too.

2. Bullying

When WAAY 31’s Shea Allen questioned Wardynski about bullying in the HCS, he was insulted and unable to comprehend the simple metaphor, sweeping it under the rug (“‘And what rug?'”).

Since he’s a numbers guy, he then tried to explain reality to us in his own language:

“Bullying has been going on for a long time. There was bullying when I was a kid. But I can tell you when we look at the statistics, while its [sic] about 80 percent of what you guys talk about its only about one percent of what we see.”

Questions: Who are “you guys” and how do you quantify whoever they are’s talk and come up with 80% about bullying? Then how do you compare this 80% of “talk” to 1% of what “we” [who?] see?

Malarky. Gibberish. Nonsense. Waste of space.

And what are we to make of this:

. . .Wardynski disagrees. “We look at statistics. We look at student discipline in our classrooms and our schools. Its [sic] gone down 60 percent in one year. So we’ve taken a lot of actions,” he insists.

Here, the antecedent of the pronoun it is discipline. So, according to W, discipline “in our classrooms” has “gone down 60 percent in one year.” If you say so, Supe.

3. Federal Funding

For the background on this, go to geekpalaver. Basically, the HCS didn’t obey the law when it came to accepting Federal funding for Special Education and now the Feds and State want back $2.6 million.

WAFF reported that “Wardynski said it’s disappointing the feds are so fixated on following spending formulas instead of what’s actually achieved”:

“And what is achieved, of course, is that we’ve gone in the right direction on student achievement. The number of schools that failed for special education students on AYP went down as this was all transpiring.  So I think the appropriate thing for government to do is focus on ‘what are taxpayers getting for their money?’ and not on ‘we gotta spend a lot of taxpayer money,'” he said.

As I see it, there is nothing for a rational, law-abiding person to talk about here. It’s as clear as a choice can be.

If you don’t want to play by the rules, stay out of the game:

  • Take Federal funds; follow Federal laws governing the distribution of those funds.
  • Refuse Federal funds; join the Crowley crowd: Do what thou wilt shalt be the whole of the law.
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2 thoughts on “Last Week in Wardynski’s World

  1. I wonder how many “humans” we are paying to “watch”, how are they “watching”, who are they “watching” and is it legal to “watch” people without their knowledge/consent? Don’t we have this little thingy called the 4th amendment and FISA?

    Creepy.

  2. Don’t forget another inside/outside blunder….”we have people watching the internet” vs. a week earlier discounting the internet as not being factual or significant.

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